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Man Gets Chopstick Stuck in Arm for Solid Month Before Noticing

Man Gets Chopstick Stuck in Arm for Solid Month Before Noticing


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A man got a chopstick stuck in his arm while out drinking

A man accidentally stabbed himself with a chopstick while out drinking, and went around with it stuck in his arm for a month.

Minor injuries are not unheard of after a night of drinking with one’s friends, but usually they’re the sort of thing one discovers upon waking in the morning. One man, however, managed to get nearly an entire chopstick embedded in his arm on a night out with his friends, and somehow he did not notice it for an entire month.

According to Shanghaiist, the man was out with his friends on what must have been an extreme night of carousing. At some point during the evening, he even managed to stab himself in the arm with a disposable wooden chopstick. That would put an end to most people’s festivities, but the man just shook it off, pulled what he thought was the chopstick out of his arm, tossed some cleaner on it, and went on with his night.

The man did not, however, notice that what he’d pulled out of his arm was much smaller than the normal chopsticks he’d been eating his dinner with. A month later, when the wound had gotten too gross for him to continue ignoring, he went to the hospital, where doctors were horrified to pull a 4-inch piece of chopstick out of his arm, where it had been lodged for a month.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


I Finally Have a Name for Those Tiny Red Bugs That Pop Up Periodically

You know them by their size (smaller than a pinhead) and their color (bright red). You see them every once in awhile crawling across the back of your hand, or on the kitchen countertop. But what exactly are these little guys?

Welp, they are clover mites. And they are pretty harmless. They eat grass and clover (hence the innocuous name) so they hang out in particularly lush lawns. They can be annoying if they make their way into the house in large numbers —which they sometimes do in the spring. You can often find them crawling near open window sills or the cracks they rudely used to come inside. They don’t stick around long so, no matter how many congregate, you won’t be stuck with them for long.

SHOULD YOU SQUASH THEM?

They won’t bother you, so just leave ‘em alone. They don’t bite, eat clothing, or teach your children cuss words when you’re not looking.

Crushing them will leave a little red skid mark behind —something to think about if you’re wearing something white or if your curtains are a light color. Don’t worry though. It’s not blood they sucked while you were sleeping. It’s just smeared bug body pigment, which can easily be cleaned up with a paper towel or sponge.

If you are undeterred by the prospect of bug bits, take them out immediately with some dishwashing detergent and water. This won’t deter them in the future, so from then on it’s all about prevention.


Watch the video: Chopstick Etiquette (May 2022).