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Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today

Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today


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Indulge in your inner child’s favorite meals.

Creamy Tomato Soup with Grilled Cheese Croutons

Ingredients:
1 tomato, diced
½ white or yellow onion, diced
½ package of Creamy Tomato Soup from Pacifico (available at Whole Foods)
Red pepper flakes

Directions:
1. Simmer tomatoes, onion and red pepper flakes in saucepan until tomatoes break down and onions are translucent, about 5 minutes.
2. Add soup and bring mixture to a boil.
3. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
4. Serve with grilled cheese croutons.

Grilled Cheese Croutons

Ingredients:
2 slices bread of choice
Shredded Swiss or cheddar cheese

Directions:
1. Butter two slices of bread.
2. Place one slice buttered side down in hot pan.
3. Pile on shredded cheese and top with other slice.
4. Brown each side and cut into 1-inch cubes.

Homemade Macaroni and Cheese

Photo by Daniel Schuleman

Ingredients:
8 ounces fun-shaped pasta
1 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon hot sauce
½ cup marscarpone or cream cheese
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Cook pasta in boiling water until al dente, about 10 minutes. Drain and set aside.
2. Cream, hot sauce, salt and pepper to a simmer in saucepan over medium heat.
3. Cook until cream is reduced by a third.
4. Add in marscapone and cheddar until melted.
5. Stir in pasta.

Chicken Nuggets

Photo by Daniel Schuleman

Ingredients:
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
½ cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
½ cup Italian seasoned bread crumbs
cup grated Parmesan
½ cup all-purpose flour
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 400˚F.
2. Cut chicken into 2-inch pieces and season with salt and pepper.
3. Mix Parmesan, bread crumbs and panko in bowl.
4. Place flour and eggs in separate shallow dishes.
5. Coat chicken in flour, shake off excess and dip in egg, then coat in panko mixture.
6. Bake for 12-15 minutes, flipping nuggets halfway through.

Yogurt Dippin’ Dots

Photo by Daniel Schuleman

Ingredients:
2-3 different flavors of yogurt

Directions:
1. Line a large plate with wax paper.
2. Fill Ziploc bag with yogurt and cut a tiny corner off.
3. Squeeze small drops onto plate.
4. Freeze overnight.

Samoas

Photo by Daniel Schuleman

Ingredients:
24 sugar or shortbread cookies
8 ounces soft caramels
1 ½ cups shredded sweetened coconut flakes
1 ½ tablespoons milk
Pinch of salt
8 ounces dark chocolate

Directions:
1. Toast coconut flakes in pan over medium-low heat, stirring regularly until golden brown.
2. Microwave caramels and milk for 30-second increments until everything has melted.
3. Spread cookies with ¼ of melted caramel.
4. Mix coconut flakes with remaining caramel and press coconut mixture onto each cookie.
*TIP: If caramel-coconut mixture thickens too much, just microwave for 15-second increments until spreadable again.
5. Microwave dark chocolate in 20-second increments until melted.
6. Dip bottoms of cookies in chocolate and let cool on wax paper-lined baking sheet.
7. Drizzle tops of cookies with remaining chocolate.

Dunkaroo Funfetti Dip

Photo by Daniel Schuleman

Ingredients:
1 box Funfetti cake mix
2 cups plain yogurt
1 cup Cool Whip
Animal crackers

Directions:
1. Mix cake mix, yogurt and Cool Whip.
2. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours and serve with animal crackers.

The post Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today appeared first on Spoon University.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.


Six Childhood Favorites You Can Make Today - Recipes

A list of Asian taro recipes from sweet to savory

I used to misspell taro root as “tarot root” often. It’s not an everyday starch on the western table. But it’s a popular alternative to potato in Asian countries, and also a source of vitamins and minerals.

There are multiple ways to cook taro root, savory and sweet. So here is a list of taro root recipes that will fit in your lunch or dinner recipe.

What is taro root?

Taro, or Colocasia esculenta, is a plant grown mostly in Asia. The edible part we are talking about is the root. It’s starchy, high in carbs, with the texture similar to yam.

How to cook taro root?

Taro is a pretty versatile ingredient. It can be used in both savory and sweet dishes. The creamy yet powdery texture makes it a popular ingredient.

You may find it on a traditional Chinese menu: taro cake, taro steamed pork ribs, taro boiled duck, and taro pudding.

Can you eat taro raw?

Never. If you are cooking taro, make sure it’s cooked thoroughly.

Raw taro contains calcium oxalate content, which may cause gout or kidney stone. And it doesn’t taste so well raw.



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